Employer Feature: Scanfil

As in the days of film photography’s prominence, development is a critical part of the process in readying job seekers for competitive employment. Much like film is developed in darkrooms, Goodwill’s program participants develop their skills in a controlled environment before they are work-ready.  March (27)

Local employers are an essential factor in this process. Supporting job seeker development in a variety of ways, including temp-to-hire positions for Goodwill skills program graduates looking for their first job in a new field, employers provide Goodwill with competitive work environments for hands-on training. They also offer insight into what their hiring needs are and how Goodwill can help prepare job seekers to meet those needs.  

Scanfil is an international contract manufacturer and system supplier, as well as an employer partner that helps make Goodwill’s mission possible. In a rapidly changing technology industry, Scanfil needs their employees to be adaptable and dependable. Goodwill’s Electronics Assembly and Soldering program has helped create a pipeline of job-ready candidates for Scanfil, where the nonprofit’s program graduates have both the technical skills and the soft skills – such as keeping up in a fast-paced environment and communicating clearly with colleagues – they need to be successful on the job. “Some of the newer manufacturing lines that we have added to the business require a higher level of skill that we weren’t finding through our normal avenues of recruiting,” says Orlando Martinez, managing director for Scanfil. “Goodwill has been a great fit to meet that need. Not just the technical skills, but the soft skills that they are learning before they come into the workplace are a huge plus.”   

Many Goodwill program graduates have had the opportunity to earn a permanent spot on the Scanfil team following successful introductory periods on the various assembly and soldering stations. “We have had a great success rate with the candidates that were brought in and have hired several as permanent employees,” says Martinez. A growing company in an in-demand industry, Scanfil adds value to Goodwill by offering its program graduates positions with high starting wages and career advancement opportunities. The collaboration is a picture-perfect example of how talent development can make a lasting impact.  

Goodwill Week 2018 Schedule: May 6-12

From May 6 – 12, Goodwill organizations across the country will host a variety of events aimed at thanking those who support them and recognizing those they serve. Here is what’s in store for Goodwill of North Georgia:

Week Long Event
Each of our 13 career centers will host job fairs throughout the week. See the calendar below for locations.

Monday, May 7 – Thank You Notes
Career center visitors can tell us why they’re thankful for Goodwill by posting a thank you note in each location. There will also be a hashtag (#GoodwillWeekATL) for Facebook and Twitter followers who wish to share their message digitally.
Job Fairs: East Athens, Oakwood and Stockbridge* Career Centers

Tuesday, May 8 – Donor Appreciation Day
We love our donors. We will share a sweet treat with donors as they make a donation that makes our mission to put people to work possible.
Job Fairs: Cornelia, Smyrna and South DeKalb Career Centers

Wednesday, May 9 –  Shopper Appreciation Day
Shoppers will enjoy 25% off a purchase of $25 or more as a thank you for their support of
our mission.
Job Fairs: Duluth, Dawsonville, Northeast Plaza, Rome and Woodstock Career Centers

Thursday, May 10 –  Influencer Event
Join fashion blogger and thrifting expert Keren Charles at our Tucker store as she helps shoppers navigate our aisles to put together stylish looks for less.
Job Fairs: Cartersville and Decatur Career Centers

Friday, May 11 –  Employee Appreciation Day
All Goodwill employees will have a “sweet” celebration as a token of thanks for all they do to help put people to work!

* Note: The Stockbridge job fair will take place with the City of Stockbridge at Merle Manders Conference Center (111 Davis Rd, Stockbridge, GA 30281) from 10AM-2PM.

A safe place for the whole family at The Drake House

Women and children make up more than 40% of Atlanta’s homeless population, contributing to the more than 10,000 individuals experiencing homelessness on any given night.

Finding a safe place for these families to stay can be a challenge, and even more so if the family includes a son age 12 or older. In Atlanta, these boys are typically required to stay in an all men’s facility.

From a need to help keep families intact, and to offer them a stable living environment where they can get back on their feet, The Drake House was born. Founded in 2004, The Drake House is a 16-unit housing program for single mothers who come from North Fulton communities.

The home is located on a MARTA line, allowing kids easy access to their current schools, and provides adequate space for the whole family to stay.

Programming at the house includes mentorship, tutoring, and support for the kids and the mothers. Mothers must be employable or already employed to be eligible. They must live in the community, and the kids must be enrolled in school in the North Fulton area.

Housing must also be the number one priority for the mothers. Once admitted into the house, they work with social workers to outline a personal empowerment plan, and then are held accountable to their goals. Every Monday, mothers are required to attend a life-skills class, which covers a variety of topics like prioritizing needs over wants, household budgeting, making better decisions, and boundary setting.

“We give them the tools and education to help them better manage not only their money, but their lives,” said Kathy Swahn, Executive Director of The Drake House.

Mothers are also required to meet every week with their social worker and a career coach. The Drake House partners with local businesses to provide employment opportunities, and the women must save the money they would otherwise be paying in rent and food costs (all provided at the house).

“That’s a critical goal so they have a nest egg when they graduate from our program to hopefully have enough for a deposit for next-step housing,” Swahn said.

The nonprofit recently acquired another property of 16 units for mothers who have gone through the full program to transition after living in the Drake House. Here, they can pay under-market rent, and must set up utilities in their own name and establish some good credit. This gives families the opportunity for up to 24-months of under-market rent housing and additional services.

Swahn said these services provided are crucial for helping moms and families get back on their feet. “When the moms finally get into the Drake House and unpack their bags, they can take a breath,” she said. “They can sit down with the trained staff, and chip away at layers and layers of trauma.”

“We sit down and say, ‘let’s rediscover your strengths and build your confidence,’” she added. The job readiness programs at the house include resume development, mock interviews, outfitting for work, and babysitters onsite to watch the kids while the mothers are in training. With an average stay of 142, moms who go through the programming see a 45-60% increase in monthly wages.

To learn more about the organization, including details on their upcoming Miss Mary’s Ice Cream fundraiser on August 26th, visit www.thedrakehouse.org.

The sky is the limit with Skye Precious Kids

April (17)When Skye Jones witnessed firsthand the struggles of her coworker in taking care of her ten-year-old son, she felt hopeless.

At ten years old, the boy’s illness prevented him from walking, required a special person to bathe him, and caused some additional hardship for the family.

“I wanted to help her and her son,” Jones said.

To do so, Jones created Skye Previous Kids, an organization that caters to families with kids who suffer from chronic illness. Through educational, health, and well-being services, the group works with children ages 16 and under.

The organization helps families in a variety of ways, including payment assistance for treatment, medical supplies, educational trainings, after-school care, transportation, food, and housing aid.

“If your family has a financial hardship and you need help, and your child has a chronic illness, we are here to listen to you,” Jones said.

The nonprofit partners with the Ronald McDonald House to help provide housing assistance, and helps by paying for first month’s rent for new living situations.

Housing issues can also include making current living situations better. Recently, SPK helped a family with a child with a muscular disorder. Their house was filled with mold, and unsafe for the child. The group inspected the house, hired a contractor, and got the necessary services done for the family to make the house a healthier environment.

To help achieve their goals and offer services to as many families as possible, Skye Precious Kids looks for support in a variety of ways, including volunteers, supplies, and funding.

“The community really plays a part in helping us supply for the needs of these families,” Jones said.

This community includes teachers who donate their time as tutors for kids with additional education needs. “These kids are very smart and independent, but they need help,” Jones said. “Anything that affects the family, we are willing to help. Everybody is affected. The child has the chronic illness, but the people in the immediate family feel it too.”

Individuals can get involved by volunteering for events, or joining the SPK Ambassadors Team. They are also calling for engagement through their SPK Challenge, which asks people to take a picture recreating the organization’s logo, reaching for the sky.

Coming up next month, SPK is hosting an event at Monday Night Brewing on May 10, to help raise money for families in need. Those interested in volunteering or supporting the organization can find out more at www.skyepreciouskids.org.

“I got in this business so I could spread more love around,” Jones said. “It’s just little things that could help a family. We are here to relieve some of that stress, to turn your frown into a smile, and to make it all better.”

Listen to their full episode by clicking here.

A coalition of support for domestic violence victims

Since 1980, the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence (GCADV), has provided critical resources and advocacy for domestic violence survivors across the state. The organization was

“Our mission is to collaborate, advocate, educate, and empower,” said Sheena Morris, Director of Community Engagement and Public Policy. “We strive to achieve this mission in a number of ways, such as training, domestic violence programs, community-based organizations, businesses, education to community groups, and public policy advocacy.”

The group prides itself on its rich history of grassroots work, and, since its beginning, has expanded their scope and outreach to broaden their programming and the diversity of those they serve.

“We’ve really grown in bringing in the larger ‘we’ of community voices into the work of our organization,” Morris said. “All communities are impacted by domestic violence. It knows no socio-economic status, no class, and no race.”

Through their guiding principles of empowerment, safety, social change, and systems accountability, just to name a few, the organization works specifically with domestic violence, in the context of intimate partner violence. This includes those who are dating, sharing the same house, and are or have been married.

GCADV works within the community to provide trainings for domestic violence first-responders, healthcare providers, and individuals. They work on core skills, including danger assessment, safety planning, and population-specific trainings. Currently, they are holding a training on Serving Black and African American Survivors of Domestic Violence, and “Don’t Knock the Hustle,” which talks about the intersections of racism and oppression on domestic violence.

For those in need of immediate support, GCADV provides holistic services to help victims of domestic violence. This includes a 24-hour hotline and a rapid-rehousing initiative, which helps find victims safe housing. With their Child and Youth Project, GCADV works with kids who have been exposed to situations of domestic violence.

They are also very active in lobbying efforts, and are currently busy advocating in the Georgia Legislature. HB 834, which will allow survivors to break a lease early if they need to flee an unsafe living environment, is of top-priority for the GCADV. The group seeks modifications and improvements to any systems or programs that relate to domestic violence. Action alerts are sent out to the group’s supporters to get engaged when an important issue is on the table.

Up next for the group is the 2018 Race for Empowerment, to be held at Piedmont Park on April 29. Proceeds will support the organization’s mission.

The coalition can be found online at www.gcadv.org. The organization is always in need of financial support, community volunteers, and program membership participants. Those in need of immediate assistance can call the hotline at 1-800-334-2836.

Blue Girls Turned Gold

For Myesha Collins, Blue Girls Turned Gold has been a passion project that she’s been dreaming up for a long time.

“It’s always been an idea because of where I came from, as far as not having resources as a woman and a young teen mom,” she said. “It’s always been a s51Te175vwNL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_eed, but I never knew how to get it to fruition.”

Now a reality, Collins works with women to help them find these resources and support they need as they navigate through life.

“I’m offering them the opportunity to be braver and see how much power you have within yourself.”

Collins said the seed was planted for her after she became a mom at 15. “Having that responsibility at that age and not having the education and experience was difficult,” she said. “Having this extra responsibility made me know that I had to go harder because it wasn’t all about me anymore.”

Collins joined the military, but was sexually assaulted within the first six months. She said this left her feeling emotionally stuck, and like she was responsible for the bad things that happened.

“I had to learn a lot of lessons, the hard way,” she said. “I want to shorten those lessons for a lot of people.”

The nonprofit works with local women to help them turn from “blue” to “gold.” This is the process, Collins said, of going from not knowing to knowing how great you are. The group helps women empower themselves and gives them resources to make it through life’s struggles and challenges.

“Experiences shape who you are but they do not dictate who you become,” Collins said.

To aid in this work, Collins also recently put together an ebook, called Blue Girl Turns Gold. Along with eight other women and one man, the book shares stories of hardships and resilience, and finding the strength within one’s self to overcome.

“It was therapeutic for me, but I also knew so many women who had the stories,” she said. “It is empowering to see them empowered, and to me, that’s what it is all about.”

“I was looking outside for answers, for support, for encouragement, when all that was within me along with a higher power,” Collins said. “Experiences will occur, how you move forward is all that matters.”

Her organization is also partnering with the Genius is Common movement, to let everyone know they have genius within them. “Everybody starts out with a genius in them, you just have to figure out what the genius is,” Collins said. “It’s getting back to that seed that is already in us and really nurturing that.”

Up next, Collins and Blue Girls Turned Gold will host a Genius is Common Empowerment workshop on Saturday, March 31. Attendees will be lead in conversations on the genius that is inside of them. The group will go through a series of activities and discussions, and light refreshments will be provided. The session is for all ages, but geared toward boys and girls ages nine and up.

For more information on the organization and their upcoming events, find them online at www.bluegirlsturnedgold.org, or Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Goodwill’s C3: combining college and career for long-term success

With a goal of assisting 50,000 individuals this year, and placing 24,000 in jobs, Goodwill of North Georgia has all hands on deck to help people find new or better employment.

One of the many ways they are getting the job done? C3: College Career Catalyst.

February 2018 (16)

Individuals enrolled in C3 enroll in a college or credential program while working with Goodwill to receive additional support and placement help. Working with Goodwill, they participate in skills and professional development trainings while also attending post-secondary courses.

Ashia Walker, one of C3’s Navigators (who help applicants with the program and college), said the work they do with the students is all-encompassing, ensuring success.

“Our job is to help any of our participants who are enrolled in programs with post-secondary education,” Walker said. “That includes helping them figure out where they want to go to school, what they want to study, and helping them get their applications done.”

Once they get into school, the assistance continues through the first semester, making sure they can navigate the campus and their classes. From there, after completing their educational program, Goodwill helps them get a job.

“It’s helping people not just find a job, but helping them find post-secondary education or credentials to help them further their career,” Walker said. This includes assistance for those looking to earn more money, get a promotion, or take on a leadership role.

Ideal candidates for the program are those who have gone through a training at Goodwill, or who are referred from one of the many Goodwill partner organizations. Those working with the C3 program often don’t have any family members who have gone through the college process, and need that extra help.

“They don’t even know where to start,” Walker said. “I’ve had students who actually paid for their FAFSA to be completed, not knowing it was a free application.”

Walker has worked with Goodwill for six years, and has encountered a lot of success stories during her time, including a young man who is now enrolled at Chattahoochee Technical College, with hopes of eventually transferring to Kennesaw State University to study marine biology.

Walker calls his parents once a month to check in on the student and his progress. “That makes me happy every month that he’s still in school,” she said. “It’s important to know that somebody cared and that he wasn’t just a number, and somebody is proud of him.”

The C3 program partners with a variety of local technical college partners, including Athens Technical College, Gwinnett Technical College, and North Georgia Technical College.

With 13 career centers and five dedicated navigators, those interested in working with the C3 program can essentially visit any location to be matched with assistance.  For additional information, please visit www.goodwillng.org/collegecareercatalyst.

100 Black Men of Atlanta—200 men strong

“What they see, they will be.”

These words are the guidepost for the work of 100 Black Men, a national mentoring organization whose Atlanta chapter was founded in 1986. Entrepreneur Nathanial Goldstein started the local group to combat issues facing the city’s underprivileged youth, particularly young black men.

Working with the B.E.S.T. Academy, an all-male public school in the Atlanta Public School System, the group focuses on helping students achieve academic, social, and emotional success. Throughout the course of their high school experience, the 100 Black Men of Atlanta organization provides critical guidance and support with an overarching goal of getting the men through high school and on to college.

And they’ve been quite successful in this endeavor: 100% of the students who participate in the program graduate from high school.

100 Black Men of Atlanta’s Project Success Program helps students with college prep and tuition assistance, working with students as young as the 3rd grade. Students in the program must commit to all the organization’s standards and participation guidelines, and the student’s parent/guardian must also express interest and involvement in the program. Similarly, the Project Success 100 Scholar Program accepts students with a 3.0 GPA (or a 2.5 GPA with a 90th percentile standardized test score) and includes the 100 Academy (a Saturday school program), health & wellness programs, and family and youth empowerment initiatives.

Students who complete this program are eligible for a $3,000 per semester college scholarship, breaking down financial barriers and encouraging college attendance. At the college level, 100 Black Men also hosts the Collegiate 100, a coed, professional development program in which members act as mentors and tutors to the younger participants. Students from local Atlanta colleges and universities take part, including Georgia State, Georgia Tech, the Interdenominational Theological Center, Morehouse, and Spelman.

Locally, the group’s 100 men actually total nearly 200, and include Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young. Mentors also come from a variety of different backgrounds, including STEM, entrepreneurship, and even music. Chief Operating Officer Dr. Kevin James believes that these kinds of notable memberships help the young men they work with envision a brighter future.

“It’s so important, he said, “to be able to demonstrate to the students that they have positive black men out there who are doing something and making a difference.”

“It’s important for those individuals to be mentored by someone who have gone down that path that they can then follow,” James added.

The 100 Black Men of Atlanta Chapter is hosting a golf tournament, the 100 Golf Classic, on April 10th at the Manor Golf and Country Club. The event is sponsored by Georgia Power and proceeds will go toward Project Success.

For more information on the event, or on how to get involved with the organization, visit www.100blackmen-atlanta.org.

 

 

EarthShare of Georgia: protecting the environment, one employee at a time

For EarthShare of Georgia, conservation is king. In an effort to protect the air, land, and water, the organization partners with 50 employers from across the state to raise money for environmental nonprofits.

Primarily through workplace giving, EarthShare of Georgia coordinates employee giving campaigns to support more than 60 environmental and conservation organizations. With 30 based in state, and the others nationwide, there is an organization for everyone.

The group started as the Environmental Fund for Georgia in 1992, and then affiliated with the national EarthShare in 2001. In their 25-year history, EarthShare of Georgia has helped raise $6 million for its member groups.

EarthShare of Georgia’s Executive Director Madeline Reamy called into the show first. EarthShare was founded 25 years ago by environmental nonprofits who wanted representation in workplace giving.

Currently, nearly 400,000 employees across the state participate in EarthShare’s giving program, and come from a variety of companies, including Booz Allen Hamilton, Emory University, and MARTA. Employees are able to pick from a slew of environmental nonprofits, like Georgia Conservancy, Trees Atlanta, and Park Pride.

The group remains en vogue, especially as the environment becomes more and more of a hot topic. Many are connecting the dots between the benefits of improving the environment and strengthening communities. This work can also connect companies to volunteer projects in underserved areas.

“That is a new area that we have gotten into that is very exciting, because it brings many more people to the table to have a conversation about the environment and the benefits of a sustainable Georgia,” said Madeline Reamy, Executive Director of EarthShare of Georgia.

Individuals are encouraged to give and volunteer, as it makes such a critical impact on the environment. “The bottom line is those contributions help to conserve land in Georgia, they help to improve air quality, they help to strengthen work and improving the quality of our water,” Reamy added.

EarthShare of Georgia

In addition to the opportunity for employee giving, companies partner with EarthShare for its countless opportunities for employee volunteer engagement. More and more companies are looking for year-round opportunities for their employees to engage and give back to the community.

For them, EarthShare offers a variety of options, including multiple events revolving around Earth Day. The annual holiday is typically used as an entry point for interested organizations, and they can take part in three separate events, including a Corporate Green Day, Earth Leadership Breakfast, and a closing party. Members also receive special invitations to corporate sustainability forums, access to the Green Chamber, and discounted tickets to the sustainability speaker series.

This year’s Earth Day Green Challenge will be held on March 30th and 31st, and the Earth Leadership Breakfast will take place on April 12. Sponsors get package deals to support the different events. This year, Lewis Perkins of Cradle to Cradle will act as the keynote speaker.

More information on EarthShare of Georgia, and how you can get involved, can be found at www.earthsharega.org.

A network for good in Lake Spivey/Clayton County (and beyond!)

Transformational, long-lasting change can take some serious manpower. It needs a group of dedicated individuals, committed to a cause.

It doesn’t get much more dedicated or serious than the 1.2 million membership network of Rotary International, an organization devoted to creating a positive impact in communities at home and abroad.

Rotary International is an international service organization whose stated purpose is to bring together businesses and professionals leaders to provide humanitarian services. The organization wants to advance goodwill and peace worldwide, and is a non-political and non-secular group.

With 35,000 chapters around the world, Atlanta is lucky to have many right in its backyard, including the Lake Spivey/Clayton County Rotary. Now celebrating its 58th Anniversary, the local chapter takes its work, including initiatives in literacy and health, very seriously.

“I feel like it’s one of the best clubs you could possibly be a part of,” said Gina McCombs, President of the group. “It’s a group of community leaders and people who very much care about their community. We spend many, many hours doing service for our community and around the world.”

Groups typically meet once a week, either in-person or virtually. While fulfilling their main tenant of helping the community, it’s also an opportunity for members to form strong friendships.

The Lake Spivey/Clayton County Rotary Club is part of the Rotary’s District 6900, and is one of the biggest in the world, reaching from Tennessee to Florida. “We are an awesome force in the world. We love what we do,” said Claudia Mertl, the group’s Public Image Chair. “We’re passionate about what we do, and we try every way we can to make rotary accessible.”

One of their main passions? Rotary groups both locally and worldwide lend a hand to support the organization’s focus on eradicating polio. These efforts have created partnerships with some heavy health hitters, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the CDC, and the World Health Organization.

“We promised the children of the world that we would stop this disease and Rotarians always keep their promise,” Mertl added.

Locally, the Lake Spivey/Clayton County group has zeroed-in on the tragic reality of human trafficking. Supporting the safe home Gigi’s House, a place for formerly trafficked girls ages 13-19 to leave, learn, and get back on their feet, the group recently donated furniture for the house.

They also take great pride in their dictionary initiative, giving more than 20,000 dictionaries over the last 20 years to Clayton County 3rd graders. For some of these students, it’s the first book they’ve ever owned.

To join the club, individuals must be asked by a current member. A great way to get involved is to visit a club and let the President know of interest. For more information on the Lake Spivey/Clayton County group, visit www.rotarycluboflakespiveyclaytoncounty.org. Other chapters can be found at www.Rotary.org.