Goodwill Welding Program Featured in The Gainesville Times

Vickie Huff is a Welding program graduate and a welder for Atlanta Rod and Manufacturing.

One of our newest training programs – our Welding program – was recently featured in The Gainesville Times. Made possible by support from WorkSource Georgia Mountains, Arrendale Transitional Center, Hall County Transitional Center, Phillips Transitional Center, and area technical colleges, including North Georgia Technical College and Lanier Technical College, the program equips job seekers with the skills and certifications they need to forge new careers in the welding industry. Learn more about how the program even supports ex-offenders, like Vickie, as they pursue a second chance and a better life: http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/section/6/article/122242/.

 

Meet Tess.

Tess-RobertsDown time is not an option for Tess Roberts. A go-getter, Roberts takes care to ensure she always has something to do and is always working. She makes good use of her local Goodwill career center as a resource for her employment needs.

“I used the career center all the time,” she says. “I was looking for extra work because my job slowed down.” At a job fair she connected with Staffmark, which helped hire her as a warehouse employee. “My job is coming along pretty good,” Roberts says. “I take care of shipments of orders and make sure everything goes out on time.” Happy with her employment status and with the career center’s support in getting her there, Roberts has even referred two of her friends to the center this year.

Derek Phillips, lead career coach at the Northeast Plaza career center, confirmed Roberts has made good use of the facility, coming in regularly to search for job opportunities and to network with employers. “You know me, I’m persistent,” Roberts says. “I’ve got to keep a job so I can take care of me.”

I Got the Interview. Now What?

I got the interview. Now what?

– Submitted by Ben Pitts, Career Coach for Goodwill of North Georgia

Out of a stack of who knows how many résumés, yours was chosen as a potential fit for the job. You received the call. You remained calm while scheduling the date and time, and then did a little happy dance after you hung up. You know you are a good fit for the job. All you have to do is tell them why. Simple, right? But what will they ask? How should you respond? How should you dress? Job interviews involve a number of different choices, each sending a different message to the employer. Luckily, Career Connector – an online job search resource – is here with tips and information to help you enter the interview room prepared to impress.

When I was a Career Coach at the East Athens Career Center, interviews was the topic that seemed to stress job seekers the most. They had past interviews where they did not know how to prepare. So they entered the interview room unsure and unconfident. But a simple trick showed them how to prepare for the interview, which boosted their confidence and enthusiasm for the interview, which increased their chances for success. Several job seekers came back to tell me about their experience. So what is the trick?

The trick is that you already know what the interviewer is going to ask. No, I don’t have a cheat sheet for you. The company already gave you one. It’s right there in the job description. All of the qualities and experience the company needs is right there. All you need to do is go through the job description:

  1. Turn the desired skills/qualifications and responsibilities statements into questions.
  2. Practice how you will answer those questions.

For example, “Plan the production schedule for the build cycle” becomes “Are you familiar with or do you have experience in production scheduling?” Or, “Proficient Computer Skills” becomes “What computer systems and software are you familiar with?”

How you answer the questions will set you apart from other candidates. Simply answering that you have production scheduling experience is good, but telling a story about a time you overcame an obstacle while scheduling or how you improved scheduling procedures at your previous company is even better. For each question, try to recall an event where your actions demonstrate the answer.

Don’t worry if you are unable to do this for all of the questions or even answer all of the questions. Just like with other tests, you do not need to score 100% to make the grade or get the job.

For additional tips on interviews, check out Career Connector’s “Interviews” topic and “Interview Questions” article at www.careerconnector.org

Click the link below for a printable version of the latest blog post from Career Connector, powered by Goodwill®.

IGotTheInterview_Oct_2016