Meet Katie: From Anxious to Confident

Stephen Hawking once said, “Quiet people have the loudest minds.” For Katie Crunkleton, Hawking’s quote speaks volumes of truth. “Quiet people are deep and interesting,” says Crunkleton, who is one of 40 million Americans suffering from anxiety, the most common mental illness.IMG_9051

Crunkleton graduated college with a bachelor’s degree in art, but due to her anxiety considered herself to be ‘unemployable.’ “Overcoming anxiety is not easy,” Crunkleton says. She was referred by her doctor to Goodwill of North Georgia’s Workforce Development Program, which eased her transition into the workplace. “I was excited when she recommended the job training at Goodwill,” she says.

She completed mock interviews, learned about the many aspects of retail stores and how to work with others. “Being able to come somewhere everyday gave me a sense of accomplishment and I felt encouraged,” she says. With the help and support of the Cornelia Workforce Development team and Employment Specialist Velma York, Crunkleton secured her first full-time job 15 miles from home as a cashier at Dollar General. While she was relieved to have a job, Crunkleton hoped for a job closer to home. Two months later, she successfully secured full-time employment at Shoe Show in Toccoa. Crunkleton, who once feared job interviews, phone calls and the judgment of others, now confidently interacts with customers and co-workers on a daily basis.

Having worked at Shoe Show for only a year, Crunkleton is now a key holder for the store, a responsibility held only by the manager and herself. Through volunteering at job fairs with the career center staff and other program participants, Crunkleton stepped out of her comfort zone and gained confidence, as well as a community. “I put myself out there and it gave me the feeling of having a job,” she says.

Though her fear of social situations was once much stronger, Crunkleton’s creative and determined mind has remained constant. She has always enjoyed communicating with people through art and creating merchandise displays at Shoe Show is just one way she is able to express her creativity. “Visual merchandising is something that I want to continue learning about,” she says.

Grateful for a larger support system and a full-time job, Crunkleton looks forward to where her career is headed. With hopes of further using the skills obtained from Goodwill and expanding her creativity, Crunkleton dreams of owning an art gallery consisting of her unique paintings and pottery, as well as teaching art classes to the community of Toccoa.

The Winning Goal for Atlanta’s Youth

At Soccer in the Streets, it’s about more than just the game. The fundamentals of the sport are important, but so are the building blocks of the player. Pairing the two to teach the essentials of soccer while also fostering the personal development of the individual, the nonprofit works with undeserved youth to foster a love of the game, all while teaching important life skills.

Started more than 25 years ago, Soccer in the Streets saw a need to bring kids off the streets and provide them with something constructive to do. Capitalizing on the U.S. World Cup, the organization started promoting soccer to communities that typically didn’t know much about the sport.

Soccer in the Streets works with youth of all ages, starting their programming for students in elementary school, in hopes of getting kids excited about soccer at a young age. Their Positive Choice Soccer program works with these players, helping them learn how to play, but also encouraging their character and good behavior. In this program, ten life skills are matched with ten soccer skills, and are used to reinforce how to make good choices. The program encourages them to resolve problems in a peaceful and positive way, which can be easily demonstrated with soccer—working in teams, playing hard but fair, and respecting the players and the referees.

Soccer in the Streets

“We train them in soccer, but also try to be a positive influence in their lives,” Soccer in the Streets Executive Director Phil Hill said.

As they get older, players can take part in the Life Works curriculum of the organization, competing in the sport while also learning about opportunities for employment and economic independence. Soccer in the Streets also offers one-day clinics and tournaments for participants to further practice their skills that they have learned for both on and off the field.

While working with Atlanta’s youth, Soccer in the Streets is also making history, facilitating the world’s first soccer field in a transit station. After convincing the city of the idea, and getting the Atlanta United MLS team on board, they funded the field with local partners, and have helped solve the biggest issues for the kids they serve—a lack of transportation or a way to get to their practices and games. Currently in its pilot phase, there are plans to replicate the field in nine more MARTA stations.

With the increased popularity of the sport, Soccer in the Streets has experienced communities receptive to their mission. To continue their work, and make the most of the growing interest, they host four fundraising soccer events every year, bucking the trend of the traditional stuffy, black tie sit-down events. Players and teams can sign up to play, and raise money to compete. Throughout the year, teams play in these events, which include country-affiliated and corporate-based teams. These tournaments are competitive, and raise the necessary funds for the Soccer in the Streets programming.

The fun, everybody-can-play event takes place in October. The Black Tie Soccer Game brings together players dressed in black tie and ball gowns! To learn more about how to participate in one of these events, or to volunteer with Soccer in the Streets, visit www.soccerstreets.org.

Listen to the full episode, here.

Atlanta’s School of Rock

The Märchen Sagen Academy offers professional-led training for kids in everything from stop-motion animation to voice over work. Led by Executive Director Couleen LaGon, a video and music producer by trade, Märchen Sagen provides hands on programs to inspire local youth. “We develop humans, and their ideas,” LaGon said. “We are teaching these kids that they don’t have to compete for their world—they can create it.”

Märchen Sagen Academy

“I think that’s the most important thing that we do here—to teach these kids that nothing is impossible. If you can believe and have a little bit of applied faith and some personal action, you can do anything that you want to do.” Opened in August of 2016, Märchen Sagen has attracted many of its students through word of mouth and walk-ins off the street. The Academy also has a performing group that does shows at local schools, building even more local interest.

And the attention doesn’t stop there. The kids in the program were recently hired by Leon’s Full Service Restaurant to produce their new local advertisement. The Academy hopes to continue to provide these services to local individuals and businesses to give participants real-life training, all while securing funds for Märchen Sagen.

While the school year is in session, Märchen Sagen holds a daily after-school session from 2:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. at their 418 Church Street location, offering students the chance to learn about making electronic music, songwriting, filming on a green screen and video production. Providing snacks for the students while they are there, Märchen Sagen offers a variety of different payment packages for participants, who can come between two and five days a week.

During school breaks, Märchen Sagen holds K.A.M.P, or Kids and Multimedia Production. K.A.M.P. is a full-day opportunity for students to continue honing their craft. The Academy offers day and full-week rates during these school breaks.

In addition to their work with the kids, Märchen Sagen is also available for additional video production and studio space. Offering quality equipment and production tools, artists can rent out the studio for recording and tracking work. With the Artists Development Package, artists get six hours of studio time, which includes one hour of pre-production, four hours of production time, and one hour of mastering.

The Academy is also available for parties and events, offering locals the opportunity to rent out the historic space. Those interested in learning more or enrolling in the summer camp can visit their website at www.marchensagen.org.

To listen to this full episode of The Good Works Show, click here.

Leadership Tip from Usher’s New Look Alumna Kamera Cobb

Usher’s New Look alumna Kamera Cobb learned a thing or two from going through the four-year program. One of the many leadership tips she picked up while participating with the nonprofit? Networking, and how you present yourself, is key.

Usher
Usher

She emphasizes this with the current students of the program, with whom she advises. “It’s all about eye contact, a firm handshake, and speaking clearly,” she tells them.

These tips are also critical when interviewing for a job. First impressions are key, and even the littlest component of the initial meeting can contribute to the overall success of the interview. Beyond eye contact and confidence Cobb suggests, here are a few more ways to make your mark.

  1. Don’t be late. But don’t be too early. The potential employer might have a very busy schedule, so don’t show up too ahead of your interview, making them scramble to be available.
  2. Dress appropriately. This will likely be the first time you have met the employer face-to-face. Make sure you wear something that fits well, is ironed and clean, and is professional.
  3. Practice your elevator speech. All interviews are different, but it’s usually a given that you’ll be asked to tell the interviewer a little bit about yourself, and why you are a good fit for the job. Be prepared with this answer.
  4. Treat everyone with respect. You aren’t just trying to impress the interviewer. Make sure to be kind and appreciative to everyone from the secretary to the CEO.
  5. Send a handwritten thank-you note. Emails and quick communications are the norm. Stand out by taking the time to write, and mail, an appreciation for the time of your interviewers.

For more job and leadership tips tune in to The Good Works Show on Saturdays at noon on News Radio 106.7 FM or catch the podcasts at https://soundcloud.com/thegoodworksshow.

Meet Rosita

Rosita Aranad completed Goodwill's C3 program and now works as a medical translator.
Rosita Aranad completed Goodwill’s C3 program & works as a medical translator.

Rosita Aranad faced challenges assimilating into a new culture after immigrating to the U.S. The single mother of two had to overcome language barriers, learn new customs and find a way to provide for her family without the equivalent of an American G.E.D.

Goodwill’s Youth Employment Services (Y.E.S.) program helped Aranad find her way back into the public school system to complete her secondary education and helped her with the transition to college. “The Y.E.S. program helped me with gas money and a part-time job,” she says. “But that was high school. Goodwill helped me go back to college and get a certificate so I can work in the medical field — that was my dream job.”

Now employed as a full-time Spanish/English translator at a medical office in Gainesville, Aranad is glad to be a provider and role model for her family.

 

Spring Spotlight: Youth Employment

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We’re hoping to put a spring in the step of youth ages 16 to 24 looking for their first job or a new one. Here’s a look at youth-focused job fairs and employment workshops at Goodwill career centers throughout North Georgia this Spring.

March 25

Youth Job Fair Workshop in Stockbridge

March 26

Youth Job Fair in Stockbridge

April 5

Youth Job Fair in Woodstock

April 7

Youth Job Fair in Decatur

For more information on career center events for all job seekers (youth and older) check out our career center calendars. With 11 local centers that are free and open to the public, Goodwill career centers are great resources for taking the next step in your career.